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Everything You Were Expecting and Everything You Were Not: A Listen To Born A Loser By Myd

Updated: May 4



Everything you were expecting and everything you were not. Myd's kaleidoscopic debut album, Born a Loser, unveiled April 30th, is christened a contemporary treasure, teasing out a frolicsome side to dance music with the utmost integrity and ability to bless the mainstream under its superlative presence. Our Paris record spinner teeters on the edge of a mountain, ready to take off and soar high.

“For me, the album is ending a chapter more than opening a new one. I see inspiration like a lung. Sometimes you are inhaling, and you need to take inspiration and wisdom from lots of people. Then you have other times when you need to produce a lot. To create this album, I was by myself. The next chapter will be working with other people and sharing what I did,” he plans.

Our inauguration into the world of Myd came when we were in dire need of light-hearted fun last year and, as if by magic, Together We Stand drifted in on the summer's breeze, inciting a new musical win in an iconic LA colour-saturated video. It is the irresistible melody level with the swirl of the choir that lift spirits, but noticeable in a good few numbers, the chord progression hits you just there, prominent in opener We Are The Light. Banging beats evolve into an indie track with a spectrum of instruments and the affirmation, "We are the future, we are the light." Ravishing.



Whether the Weather is in the aforementioned category: an emotional beauty of a vintage record turning against a dense techno rhythm with guitar from Juan Wuaters. A couple of numbers are short and sweet: Oozing wobbly production lushness that Myd has claimed, a cowboy kicks the dust in There Is a Snake In My Boot. Always A Light drips with its tropical, beachy vibrations, also unearthed in Let You Speak, hallmarked by an unevenly wound cassette tape reinforcing his comforting buzz.

Due to our entertainer's natural charm and personality, humour and fun is a thread of glitter throughout. In the Mac DeMarco whistling collab Moving Men, the sentiment of a cute bromance spreads: The moving men, just me and him, dancing with the boxes, just moving men,” and disco grooves are apparent in I Feel Better (I Got Something) showing off the smooth tones of Myd's singing voice.

Poppy bursts rear their head, and RnB feels are evoked for Call Me where birdsong and spanishy guitar patterns underline the tale of a couple who like each other, but the timing is just all off: "Call me, whenever you want, if he's not the one, you know where to find me." Capering with rhythm further, It's About You poses a voguish take on piano house bursting into a garage beat and repetitive loops.



Older ditty The Sun acts almost as an indicator of how far the Lille lad has travelled, allowing experimentation to flow freely under the nurturing guidance of label Ed Banger. Sampling The O-Jays, Now That We Found Love is one for late-night dancing with plenty of playful effects to indulge, while title track Born A Loser flips Derrick Harriot's vocals from reggae number The Loser and bathes in its muffled state cavorting with a baseline that slaps.

End of jamboree hymn We Found It basks in birdsong and a rush of endorphins featuring Bakar singing in French entwined in our higher-toned lead's English drawing a close to festivities, finally removing the taboo of sweat-drenched hugging.

As the world enters a recovery phase, there could not be a more suited accompaniment than Born A Loser. Myd has a talent of delivering the sun on your face wherever you are in the world, inviting each and every one present into the united dance music community. Come one, come all, let the gorgeousness enhance your mood as you are invited to the party and benefit from an eclectic fruit salad this summer.



Article by Beverley Knight

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